dance

More from Bodies in Dissent (Daphne Brooks). Relates  in  a direct way to research around Shape, but speaks to the indirect strategies of Soulographie in general. Elsewhere Brooks uses a challenging phrase that we probably don’t want to put on our postcard – but she speaks of the strategic value of a “spectacular opacity” – using not-saying as a means of focusing on what is being withheld from expression (because it needs to be protected from an excess of “interpretation,” because the testimony must remain – at some reach, in some way – the exclusive possession of the one who testifies) –

 

“At the close of In Dahomey, each of then cakewalking couples danced their way through and across the ‘problem of the colorline.’ In hoop gowns and black tie, these performers elegantly enacted what Randy Martin avows is the political intent and process of dance itself. As Martin contends, dance ‘does not name a fixed expression but a problem, a predicament, that bodies might find themselves in the midst of, whose momentary solutions we call dancing. Unlike most political practice, dance, when it is performed and watched, makes available reflexively, the means through which mobilization is accomplished.’ Mobilizing themselves into the ‘twoness’ of Du Bois’s new century ‘blackness,’ the company’s cakewalkers repeatedly disassembled and re-ordered the articulation of black identity formation.”

 

The plays are dance in this sense: “dance ‘does not name a fixed expression but a problem, a predicament, that bodies might find themselves in the midst of, whose momentary solutions we call dancing.

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